Cvs Tools

Brought to you courtesy Panoptic, these are some little scripts that came about by following ThreeStrikesAndYouAutomate.

http://panoptic.com/rking/pkg/cvstools.tgz

If you work with CVS on the command line, you might find them useful.

The current output of "make doc": Please give me any other feedback you might have.

Some semisignificant updates:

Why do you say that meaningful commit messages are YAGNI? How else can you easily tell what the purpose for a set of changes was, without diffing and examining the files (which is kind of time consuming)?

I have found that I commit changes about 50 times more often than I need to know what the purpose for an old set of changes was, and that about 80% of the commit comments that were "meaningful" at the time are now unhelpful.

My experience has been different. I use commit messages not to determine what changes have occurred in a commit, but to locate the origin of a specific change I'm looking for (e.g. using cvs log). If I spent more than 30 seconds writing a commit message, I spent too long. Mind you, I haven't done any math on this.

I don't always skip the commit messages. If there's a really good way to describe it, I'll cvs ci -m "...". But blamelog's really do tell a lot, for the times I might overzealously use cvsci.


See also CvsToys


For a long long time I've been depending on a pair of one-liners I call diffprep and diffcommit to help me generate sensible cvs log messages. diffprep simply runs 'cvs diff ' and prepends a comment character to each line. I redirect its output to a file, which I then visit in my editor and read through. As I see each change, I can write the appropriate description into the file (without the comment character), then when done I pipe the annotated diff file into diffcommit, which discards the original diff, spits the annotations into per-file commit messages, and runs the appropriate cvs commands

 :; cat ~/scripts/diffprep 
 #!/bin/sh
 cvs diff -u $* | sed 's/^/# /g' 
 echo '# Index: done'
 :; cat ~/scripts/diffcommit 
 perl -ne 'if(/^\# Index: (.+)$/) { if($fn) { $out=~s/\047/\047\\\047\047/g;	$out=~s/^\n+//s;$out=~s/\n+$//s; print "cvs commit -m \047$out\047 $fn\n"}; $out="";$fn=$1}; if(!  /^\#/) { $out.=$_ };' 

I subsumed this into cvsmeaningfulci, above. Thanks for the great tip! (Hopefully we'll all use cvsci one day, but this is an excellent bridge.)


A suggestion for cvsmv: how about automatically create log texts "renamed from ... to ..."? --SlavenRezic (2003-03-21)

Actually, version 1 of cvsmv had exactly that. But the scary thing is that it automatically commits the changes. So, the next best thing is to output a cvs ci -m "..." line, that can then be pasted back into the shell... but for some reason I decided against it. Lately, I've been using SubVersion, which as a real move command. --RyanKing

EditText of this page (last edited May 8, 2005) or FindPage with title or text search