Aeron Chair

Aeron chairs have become the symbol of the profligate DotBomb era. But they are good chairs! If one has a bad back, I haven't really found a better chair for less money. And they are only about twice as expensive as "normal" chairs. On their website, you will also get a video and pdf on how to adjust them to your body.
http://www.hermanmiller.com/CDA/SSA/Product/0,1592,a10-c440-p8,00.html


If you don't "configure" the chair correctly, your back tends to get worse, not better. I am religiously against these chairs, as my back is already messed up. Occasionally, you will see me throw one these chairs into the hallway after someone has "replaced" my chair with their piece of $#@!. -- SunirShah

What one should be religiously against is people replacing the chair they've set up for themselves with another one not set up correctly. I have seen an office full of aerons, each with someone's name marked on the back. -- KeithBraithwaite

Even with ordinary office chairs, it is a good idea to set them up carefully, and maybe to adjust the settings through the day. With highly configurable chairs like the Aeron, it's all the more important. We had an ergonomist come in and teach us how to do this. Interestingly, she reccommended buying very plain chairs, without contoured upholstery, and then attaching shaped pieces as necessary to make the chair fit you. Since the aeron is not padded, but rather is constructed with fabric streched over movable elements, it's not clear whether they are good or bad in this respect.

GREAT chairs. A friend has one she picked up used. A hotel in Baltimore (the Wyndham) has them in every single room; I can't imagine what this cost, and doubt it increases their revenue at all, but I sure do find it a nice perk when I go there. -- DanielKnapp

I want one, but I wonder if anyone has more information about contras of these chairs, ie, if you suffer from your back, as has been pointed out. -- LeonardoHerrera


Actually, the best office chair I've found is a $129 no-name brand sold at OfficeMax (AmericanCulturalAssumption warning) - item #01215919. We bought a bunch for the office (I guess that makes us a non-dot-com-type of company ;-), and I liked it so much that I bought one for myself at home (as have others). Sitting in it for 8 hours causes no fatigue. Comes with a 15-year warranty. -- MikeSmith

I have a chair by Steal Case known as "Please"; I have had this chair for 3 years and have found it very comfortable. It's certainly an improvement on bog standard office type models.

Some people find BallChair comfortable.


The fabric is an open mesh, so when you break wind the sound carries instead of being muffled. Hence, these chairs are not suitable for PairProgramming.

Hmm. I wonder if they took this into account when they designed the PairOn chair.

They had these at ArsDigita in London and still people wonder where all the money went. The office looked more like a minimalist art gallery than an office. I doubt that the original macintosh team or the Xerox Parc people went in for designer environments. (Bill Joy commented in one of his talks on jini that lots of really innovative teams seem to have got on well in grubby surroundings. Guy Kawasaki said something similar in his book "RulesForRevolutionaries".)

We’ve been Aeron Chair loyals since the 90’s and haven’t found support cushions that complement Herman Miller’s modern style. So we handcrafted the U-Fo Saddle Collection - they’re stylish and comfortable leather lumbar pillows and seat cushions that come in pops of modern color. We’re based in San Francisco.


This page is ranking very high in Google, and we have had many of our potential customers queered on buying this product. The Aeron chair has revolutionized office seating and we have thousands of happy clients sitting in this chair. The Aeron chair has relieved many people from chronic back pain, and we are asking for your help in �taking down� this page from the Internet. -- an office equipment vendor

I have received this request by phone and email. In response I've neatened this page up a bit and will here state that these are only anecdotal comments from the users of chairs, all presumably leading a dangerously sedentary life in the computer industry. I remind all authors that we are ranked highly in Google and should accept with that the responsibility to be fair and cautious when criticizing any product. -- WardCunningham


I have one of the lower-end models from the same company, but the seat eventually tore on me. The seat construction itself looks like the higher-end model, perhaps the same kind of construction. (Yes, I probably should lose weight.)


They also make Aeron touch up paint: http://www.beverlyhillschairs.com/detailing-amp-tune-up/touch-up-paints/touch-up-paint-for-herman-miller-aeron-and-mirra-chairs-graphite too. My chair got all scratched up by my dog, and the touch up paint worked great. It looks new again.


After years of suffering from back, neck, and shoulder problems associated with long hours in an inadequate office chair, I finally bought the Aeron chair by Herman Miller and haven't woke up sore from chair pains since. -- http://www.elite-ergonomic-chairs.com/


I have had an Aeron chair for over a year now, and have had some suspicious new back pains emerge. I CANNOT directly link them to the chair. In fact, that's why I'm on line today: to see if anyone else has similar experience. My "sense" is that the mesh seat allows a kind of rotational force that is not good for the spine/hips. The rotation I mean is that I feel all my weight pressing down in the center of the chair, beneath my spine... the mesh sags there, and so my "cheeks"/hip bones are rotated outward. This is very uncomfortable. Again: I don't know if the Aeron Chair is the cause... but it certainly isn't the solution at this point.

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I also had the problem where my hips felt 'rotated' outwards and upwards. I ended up with lots of knots in my glutes and odd new back pain, and am on a series of anti-inflammatories still. I hate that stupid chair. CategoryErgonomics

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