Dev Null

--PhlIp


From UnixPowerTools (and finally credited to: Evan Marcus and Chuck Yerkes when we were at Fusion Services Group in 92. Posted to Sun-managers list (and we were flamed and praised for that.) This version is partial (we struggled for 10 and got 10. see below (and thanks for fame/infamy Jerry))).

What to do with a Full BitBucket

[The techniques in this article should be performed carefully, and only by a fully qualified and inexperienced system administrator. --JP]

Q: Our SPARCstation 1+ 4.1 OW2 started running very slowly. When I logged out, I got the message "/dev/null full: empty bit bucket."

A: The problem is that null is full. Your void space is no longer void; it's full up. The top ways to empty an overflowing bit bucket:

1. Open the computer. Look for the bit bucket, find the red stopper at the bottom of it and open it over a large wastebasket.

2. [deprecated for the sake of environmental sustainability:] Take the ethernet terminator off. Type the command:
       % cat /dev/null > le0
This spits the bits into the ether.

3. When you write to /dev/null, the 0's (zeros) don't take up any space, but the 1's (ones) do. Try writing a file full of 0's to /dev/null. Use binary 0, not ASCII 0; ASCII 0 will start overfilling the partition.

4. This is a common problem only if you use the computer. If you stop using it, it won't have many problems at all. Kick the other users off, too.

5. Run lots of C programs. They have null-terminated strings that will use up the extra bits in /dev/null.

6. Consider upgrading to a byte bucket or even a word bucket.

7. Bring the computer to Mr. Goodwrench. He will drain the bit bucket, change the oil, and add windshield fluid, all in 29 minutes or less. Now that's a deal.


The ORIGINAL:
 On 2/10/92, you allegedly write:
 > From: hacker@tumbler-ridge.caltech.edu (Jon Hacker)'
 > Subject: /dev/null full'
 >
 > Our sun sparc 1+ SunOS 4.1 OW2.0 started running very slowly.  When
 > I logged out I got the message /dev/null full: empty bit bucket.
 >
 > What does this mean?  It seems to be running fine after a reboot
 > but I am wondering if only the sympton is cured.
 >
 >Jon Hacker
 >MMIC Group, EE
 >Caltech, Pasadena CA
 >hacker@rumbler-ridge.caltech.edu
 The problem is that null is full.  Your void space is no longer void, it's
 full up.

THE TOP TEN WAYS TO EMPTY AN OVERFLOWING BIT BUCKET:

10) Open the computer up. Look for the bit bucket, find the RED stopper at the bottom of it and open it up OVER a LARGE trashcan. 9) Stop using the computer for 6 months, let the bits compost and continue. 8) Take the ethernet terminator off, and "cat /dev/null > le0". This spits the bits into the ether. 7) When you write to /dev/null, the 0's don't take up any space, but the one's do. Try writing a file full of 0's to /dev/null (binary 0, NOT ASCII 0 - ASCII 0 will start overfilling the partition). 6) This is a common problem _only_ if you use the computer. If you stop using it, it won't have many problems as all. Kick the other users off too. 5) If you use lots of C programs, they have Null terminated strings that use up the bits in /dev/null. 4) Bring the computer to Mr. Goodwrench, he will drain the bit bucket, change the oil and add windshield fluid, all in less than 29 minutes. Now that's a deal. 3) Consider upgrading to a byte bucket or even a word bucket. 2) Since your already using Open Windows, open a window and toss the useless bits out the open window. 1) Stop using the game "fortune" in your .logout script, Mr "Hacker".

good luck Frank Ortune (fortune@fsg.com) (aka chuck yerkes & evan marcus aided and abetted by the fsg crew)

See also: BitBucket, BitSpin, ChipTorque
CategoryJoke CategoryHumor

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