Cocoa Worlds

Cocoa simulations consist of objects of various types that exist on a grid and respond to spatial rules. Cocoa is Java for kids of all ages. Kids Domain has preserved material from Apple's Cocoa web site that you will need to run these simulations on your Macintosh.


Elevators
11 kilobytes
18 years old
This world simulates a building with elevators. It has people traveling on floors and cars traveling in shafts. The rules are general enough to allow multiple cars per shaft but not (yet) multiple people per car.  

BinFib
6 kilobytes
19 years old
Binary digits cooperate to compute the Fibonacci sequence in two registers cross connected by gravity.  

TubeRaces
4 kilobytes
19 years old
Tubes move by binding stuff on one end and releaseing it on the other. In this world two tubes race each other by compeating for free stuff in the environment.  

PortlandPattern
11 kilobytes
19 years old
Dynamic art copied from a rubber stamp kit.  

DannyiumZanide
31 kilobytes
19 years old
Atoms of Dannyium and Zanyium spontainously bond to produce DannyiumZanide gas. A team of little demons reverse the reaction. Solid tubes and vessles create stable gradients of these reagents. Get the source to try your own configurations or experiment with some unfinished pieces.  

GimmeFive
10 kilobytes
19 years old
Bits squirt into this world two at a time and fall into places that would soon fill up if it weren't for the carry rule that will trade two-bits for one. Modify the source to count higher or to jam up the works by blocking carrys.  

Nitrogen
18 kilobytes
19 years old
Electrons occupy orbitals in just the right quantity to make this Bohr model atom be Nitrogen.  

WillieSmilies
22 kilobytes
19 years old
Constructive and destructive Smilies make this world a changing place. When they occasionally get stuck you can click to do your own destructing as required to get things moving again.  

SystolicStack
6 kilobytes
19 years old
Press the buttons to push tokens on to or pop tokens off of a systolic stack. The tokens follow spacing rules that prevent waiting no matter how big the stack. Once logic like this was thought to be important for the future of integrated circuit design.  


All worlds © 1998 Ward Cunningham